Think Pink is a personal confirmation of the fact that, in spite of the many theoretical contradictions associated to contemporary art, it is not possible to stop making it.

 

This installation, composed of paintings, drawings and sculptures, comes from the necessity of providing a physical response to the continuous crisis in art students and artists’ minds: ¿why should we keep making art?

 

In this project, subjects such as political art are addressed through the use of images that contain a heavy political charge, questioning the viewer about the effects these images are intended to have on a given audience. The Mono Jojoy’s picture, which morbidly exhibits his watery internal explosion, is the clearest local example. As a matter of fact, the military authorities and the media, ignoring the negative connotation of distributing images of violence and death, exhibited the apocaliptic pictures of the guerrilla leader’s corpse, as a means of humiliating the enemy, an act as impulsive as showing the neighboring feudal lord’s head on a spike.

Additionally, these images question our socially constructed precepts about morality and consequently about our cultural identity (I consider necessary to mention the not so uncommon fanaticism for gore images or the simple interrogation about the biological origins of our attraction to morbid images and the role it plays in survival).

 

Besides questioning the effectiveness of political art, Think Pink faces a charge more autochthonous to Latin American art: the need of asking local artists why, even though it is a “criollo” cultural product, image production is still partly dependent on purely occidental media such as oil paint. This reflection is executed through three topics that are interweaved aesthetically: the use of a group of visual conventions of Candy confectionary and pastry-making, the use of oil paint as a plastic matter, and shit (a recurrent icon  in the politically correct artistic-punk rebellion).

All this conflict, ironically  is unchained in an abundant artistic production, thus giving a  clear answer to the initial question: ¿and how to stop making it?

Installation in the Project Room, University of the Andes, 2011
Think Pink

Think Pink

View of the installation 2011

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5.JPG

General View

Think Pink

Think Pink

View of the installation

Bonomes

Bonomes

Oil paint, charcoal, conte on canvas 86x70 inches

Think Pink

Think Pink

Stampede Charcoal, oil paint, conte 70 x 100 cms

Juarez I Oil paint,charcoal, conte 60 x 80 cms

Juarez II Oil paint, charcoal, conte 100x 70 cms

Think Pink

Think Pink

Mono Jojoy Cake, oil on canvas 2011

Bouquet for the defunct

Bouquet for the defunct

3 pieces Variable sizes Polyurethane foam,unfired clay, sugar flowers

detail

Sample set Oil paint, sugar sprinkles, cake base 50x 50 x 70 cms 2011

All flourishes with love Unfired clay, oil paint, sugar flowers 300 pieces/1:1 scale 2011

All flourishes with love detail

Bourgeois colors "Red and black are perceived asdramatic and strong, while pink represents bourgeois babies, the soft, the weak".

Monochromes 7 pieces Oil paint on canvas

Monochromes/ Condo

Monochromes/ Condo

20 x 30 cms Oil paint, monopoly houses

30 x 30 cms

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68.jpg

25 c 25 cms

Monochromes/ Gadafi's finger

Monochromes/ Gadafi's finger

12x7 inches oil paint on canvas

25 x 25 cms

75.jpg

75.jpg

30 x 30 cms

Bichromes 3 pieces Oil on Canvas variable sizes

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b_edited.jpg

Purple gold 40 x 40 cms

Pink green 40 x 40 cms

Baby blue royal blue 30 x 22 cms

Think PInk

Think PInk

cookie title 2011

Think Pink

2011

Sara Milkes 2018